Are You Making This Job Search Mistake? Do Not Stop Your Job Search, Even When An Offer Seems Imminent

– Posted in: troubleshooting

I once had a client who made this common job search mistake:

She should have wrapped up her search weeks ago based on how the hiring process seemed to be going.  However, the company budget was tightening, and it turned out that the job she seemed poised to get would not be filled after all.  While she had had other companies in play at the start of her job search, she had slowed down the pace on those leads. Now she needs to rebuild her job search.

Ideally, she would have kept these other job leads moving simultaneously with her most promising job prospect, but she didn’t – a job search mistake I see too often. Do NOT let this happen to you. Do not make the job search mistake of slowing down your overall job search, even when an offer seems imminent. Continue with your other job leads even as one, two or even several prospects seem likely to close.

In a job search, persistent and regular action is the key to getting in front of the right opportunities at the right time.  It’s like persistent and regular investing — you shouldn’t try to time the market because you risk investing right before a downturn or pulling out your money right before the market makes big returns.  Similarly, in a job search, there is also a timing factor of being front of mind when opportunities arise. If you put yourself out there day in and day out, you are more likely to get the timing right and be front of mind when that ideal job arises.

Unfortunately, when interviews are going well for one job, too many job seekers make the job search mistake of letting other opportunities lapse. Don’t stop looking elsewhere even if interviews are going well with one prospect. There are multiple reasons, outside of your control, that an encouraging job search lead might not pan out:

  • the budget for the hire could disappear
  • another candidate could materialize late in the process and suddenly become the front-runner
  • the chemistry with a key decision-maker who only gets involved at the end of the interview process may not fit with you
  • the role might change and your background might no longer be as good a fit….

Your additional job search efforts will not be wasted even if the promising lead becomes an offer, and you do accept it. The people you meet pursuing other job search prospects can be added to your network. The additional interviews you conducted are good practice for you in positioning yourself and help you learn about other companies. The information you hear about other roles and companies clarify your own interests. For all of these reasons, do not stop your job search, even if an offer seems imminent.

Our FREE job search mini-course is available now! Register HERE to get the course delivered right to your inbox.

2 comments… add one
ccenizalevine October 7, 2008, 8:56 pm

I totally agree. Thanks for noting that!

Tiffany October 7, 2008, 8:29 pm

Great advice!

A similar approach can be said when someone decides to leave their job for another. I think that when doing this you should not let anyone know of the progress and don’t give in your two weeks notice unless you are absolutely sure that in two weeks you will be walking into another position. Nothing hurts more than losing a bill paying job due to a fall through of another. Getting a job these days is difficult and risky. The term “better safe than sorry” should be the mantra of all job seekers today.

  • ccenizalevine October 7, 2008, 8:56 pm

    I totally agree. Thanks for noting that!

  • Tiffany October 7, 2008, 8:29 pm

    Great advice!

    A similar approach can be said when someone decides to leave their job for another. I think that when doing this you should not let anyone know of the progress and don’t give in your two weeks notice unless you are absolutely sure that in two weeks you will be walking into another position. Nothing hurts more than losing a bill paying job due to a fall through of another. Getting a job these days is difficult and risky. The term “better safe than sorry” should be the mantra of all job seekers today.

Leave a Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.