4 Surprising Ways HR Can Help You – CBS Moneywatch

I am quoted in Amy Levin-Epstein’s career advice piece for CBS Moneywatch on 4 surprising ways HR can help you:

Help care for your loved ones. If you’re spending time trying to find affordable child-care or elder care, that takes you away from your responsibilities at work, notes Caroline Ceniza-Levine, partner with SixFigureStart, a career consulting firm. “Many companies offer Employee Assistance Program services,” says Ceniza-Levine. “These are hotlines staffed by service representatives who can help you navigate different types of wellness and work/life offerings. These offerings may be things you pay for out-of-pocket, but the EAP can help with recommendations and research.”…

Help you with a conflict early on. Most of the time, HR gets involved when an issue between boss and direct report can’t be resolved between the two parties. “HR can help you brainstorm advice [without] escalating an issue to a formal complain,” says Ceniza-Levine. The key here is developing a professional friendship with an HR member beforehand, and asking them for their take in a casual way. “This is more effective than always trying to figure things out on your own or waiting till there is an issue that you want to formally bring to HR.”

Read more tips in the full article on CBS Moneywatch: Surprise! 4 Ways HR Can Help You.

 

CBS Moneywatch Career Coaching Advice For Getting Noticed At Work

In this career advice piece from Amy Levin-Epstein for CBS Moneywatch, several career coaches, including myself, share tips on how to get the proper recognition in the workplace:

Caroline Ceniza-Levine, partner with the career consulting firm SixFigureStart

“If you are doing a good job but still getting overlooked, then your good works are not getting back to your boss. This is when you’ll also need to ask for a meeting and share the commendation emails or specific achievements you’ve [collected]. Don’t resent your boss for overlooking you — tell him or her exactly what you have accomplished and what you’d like (a raise, a promotion, a stretch assignment). To ensure this doesn’t happen in the future, confirm with your boss how often you can expect feedback and how she or he likes to be updated.”

Read more strategies and tips in Amy Levin-Epstein’s piece for CBS Moneywatch: Help! My Work Goes Unnoticed At The Office

 

How to find a company contact before you apply

Yes, it pays to get the name of someone who works at a company you want to work for. I share job search tips on this topic with Amy Levin-Epstein in her latest piece for CBS Moneywatch: How to find a company contact before you apply:

(MoneyWatch) In any competitive job market, putting in your application can seem like sending your resume into a black hole. Applying through an online database? That can feel like an even deeper black hole. The key is to make a contact at the company so that you can apply to a person, or at the very least, have a person flag your application for review. “Most companies prioritize referrals over unsolicited candidates because historically, better hires come from referrals over unsolicited candidates. Recruiters spend seconds reviewing a resume. A referral will move you to the top of the pile,” says Caroline Ceniza-Levine, partner at Six-Figure Start and co-author of Six Steps to Job Search Success. Here’s what to know about finding a contact:

Realize that some contacts are better than others.
In a a perfect world, you know someone works at your potential new company, says Ziv Eliraz, founder of Zao.com, a social recruiting and employee referral company: “The ideal situation though is applying through someone who both knows you well and is trusted by the company.” A former boss, colleague, friend, someone from a networking group or classmate are all excellent candidates for a contact. These are folks who are familiar with your work and your character, so they can do more than merely pass on your resume.

But also know that a new contact can be helpful.
Even a fresh contact is better than none at all, says Ceniza-Levine: “Many companies consider time spent on employee referrals to be a service to the employees and not just good hiring practice. So if an employee forwards a resume, as a courtesy to that employee, HR will take a look,” she adds. Even if they can’t “recommend” you, they can get your resume into the right hands. And that can get your foot in the door for an interview.

Read more tips in Amy Levin-Epstein’s latest piece for CBS Moneywatch: How to find a company contact before you apply

What To Do The Night Before A Job Interview

3 of my career coaching tips around peak performance and job interviews are included in the latest piece by Amy Levin-Epstein for CBS Moneywatch:

 

…what are some other ways to prepare yourself to be ready and steady before your big meeting in the morning? Here are three tips from Caroline Ceniza-Levine, career coach and author of How the Fierce Handle Fear. Here are three tips from Caroline Ceniza-Levine, career coach and author of How the Fierce Handle Fear. Try them and you might be that much closer to snagging a new job.

 

Prepare for a positive mindset.
To perform well, you need to psyche yourself up just like you would before an athletic competition. The night before an interview, you never want to do anything or see anyone who puts you in a foul mood, if you can avoid it, says Ceniza-Levine. If you’re choosing between a slasher movie or a comedy, go with the latter. If your friend or relative wants to dive into a stressful discussion, take a raincheck. Instead, have dinner with someone who makes you feel capable and good about yourself.

 

Read the other 2 tips in Amy Levin-Epstein’s What To Do The Night Before A Job Interview

Job interviews: 5 ways to leave a good impression

I’m back in CBS Moneywatch sharing career coaching advice about ending the job interview strong.  If you don’t think about ending strong, it’s easy to just be so relieved you hustle out of there and miss an opportunity for one last impression!

Engage in conversation
As you leave the office, continue your conversation, even if it’s small talk. “You can talk about the weekend, the rest of your day, ask the interviewer about the rest of their day. But you want to show that you’re poised even at this point,” says Carolina Ceniza-Levine, career coach with Six Figure Start and co-author of How the Fierce Handle Fear: Secrets to Succeeding in Challenging Times.

Read more tips in Amy Levin-Epstein’s latest for CBS Moneywatch: Job interviews: 5 ways to leave a good impression.

 

9 Tips To Prepare For A Job Interview

I’m quoted in CBS Moneywatch to share some job interview preparation strategies.  Keep in mind this is career coaching for being at peak performance for the actual interview.  These tips do not replace the preparation BEFORE the interview, when you research the company, industry and the role, and you prepare the key selling points that you know you will share during the interview!

Get your mind revved up.
Ever feel like you settle into an interview after a few minutes? That doesn’t go unnoticed. “As a former recruiter, I would see candidates come alive three or more minutes into the interview,” says Caroline Ceniza-Levine, partner with SixFigureStart, a career consulting firm. Unfortunately, that’s a big strike against you: “That’s three minutes too late, as I’ve already formed an opinion about them,” notes Ceniza-Levine, a former Fortune 500 recruiter. She suggests taking five minutes in the waiting room to review an index card with key points or an inspirational quote to make sure you’re operating at 100 percent the moment you sit down.

Organize your grand entrance.
An interviewer is not a surprise situation — you know you’ll probably be in a waiting room and that at any moment you’ll be called in. So be ready. “I can’t tell you how many candidates scramble for their bag, their coat, their water, their book, and hunched over and arms full still try to shake my hand. It’s hard to look professional and poised this way,” says Ceniza-Levine. So pare down what you’re carrying and leave a hand free to shake. She adds that you should make sure your first impression isn’t a wardrobe malfunction (for women, that may be a skirt that rides up too far, and for a man, pants that are hemmed too short). “One job seeker wore Mickey Mouse socks that so distracted an interviewer, he went from front-runner to discard,” recalls Ceniza-Levine.

Read additional tips from other career experts in Amy Levin-Epstein’s latest article for CBS Moneywatch: 9 Tips To Prepare For A Job Interview

Your Job Search Questions Answered on CBS Moneywatch Ask the Experts

I returned to CBS Moneywatch Ask the Experts to talk with host Jill Schlesinger and LinkedIn’s Nicole Williams about the 2nd quarter 2012 job market picture and answer audience questions:

 

7 signs you’re acing a job interview

Here’s my observation on the subject:

He or she asks follow up questions. Are you being ask to expand on something you’ve said? That’s a great sign. “If an interviewer has tuned out or is just going through a checklist of questions, they will not want to dig deep by asking follow-up questions,” says Carolina Ceniza-Levine, career coach with Six Figure Start and co-author of “How the Fierce Handle Fear: Secrets to Succeeding in Challenging Times.” They may also ask for their calls to be held or for a later appointment to be pushed back in order to focus solely on you.

See all 7 signs in Amy Levin-Epstein’s piece for CBS Moneywatch: 7 Signs You’re Acing A Job Interview

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-500395_162-57414682/7-signs-youre-acing-a-job-interview/

4 things to do NOW to get Summer Fridays in July

I share a tip on CBS Moneywatch on 4 things to do NOW to get Summer Fridays in July:

Get together some prime examples.
You’re not the first person to propose Summer Fridays, so find out what worked for friends at other offices. And talk to colleagues at your own company. “Find out from old-timers at your company if Summer Fridays were ever done before or even proposed. Maybe this isn’t acceptable in the company culture. It doesn’t mean you can’t change that but you want to know how uphill this battle will be,” says Caroline Ceniza-Levine, partner at career consulting firm Six-Figure Start, adding that you should also ask about the company’s history on other flexible schedule issues, like telecommuting. “These might be a proxy for how they’d feel about Summer Fridays,” says Ceniza-Levine.

Read the other tips in Amy Levin-Epstein’s piece for CBS News: 4 things to do NOW to get Summer Fridays in July

How to use humor in a job interview

I am quoted in CBS Moneywatch advising against it:

Misplaced humor can backfire, says Caroline Ceniza-Levine, career coach with SixFigureStart. “People have different senses of humor,” she says, “and some people are funnier than others. If you are naturally funny and can infuse this into your responses, then it could be worth the risk. But it is a risk. A job interview is a professional situation.”

Read other points of view in Amy Levin-Epstein’s piece for CBS Moneywatch: No Joke: How to use humor in a job interview:

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-505125_162-57391371/no-joke-how-to-use-humor-in-a-job-interview/

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