Stop Saying You Are Too Busy To Network – Fox Business

I return to Fox Business Career Accelerator to talk with Lauren Simonetti about how to network in just minutes each day:


Stop thinking that networking has to be a big production — a multi-day conference or a long lunch. There are multiple small steps you can take to build networking into each day.

Which tip will you adopt? You can read more about networking in minutes at: How To Network in Just 5 Minutes A Day.

SixFigureStart in Business Insider – Get Busy Coworkers To Read Your Emails

You need to communicate well with others in order to get your job done. This includes getting busy coworkers to read and prioritize your emails. In Emmie Martin’s latest piece for Business Insider, I share some tips for how to make your emails stand out:

1. Write a specific subject line.

The subject line will determine if workers open and read your email or ignore it, says Caroline Ceniza-Levine, a career coach with SixFigureStart. A clear, compelling subject line will entice people to open it, while a boring or generic one will get lost within a flood of other messages. Ceniza-Levine advises to also include any deadlines in the subject as well, so coworkers know how urgent the information is.

Another tip: limit the subject line to 10 words or less.

2. Include a clear objective and any deadlines at the beginning.

Concisely state the purpose of the message and any action items needed from the get-go. Make it easy for your reader to understand exactly what this message is asking of them, whether it requires merely reading to the end or responding with additional information. “A lot of people will write like the story is unfolding, and it actually should be the inverse, because by the time I get to what I need, they’ve exhausted their attention span,” Ceniza-Levine says.

Read 3 more tips at Business Insider: 5 Tips For Getting Busy Coworkers To Read Your Emails.

SixFigureStart in Yahoo Finance — Answering Questions For Passerbys In NYC

It was so much fun shooting the career Q&A at Bryant Park in NYC for Yahoo Finance:

Some of the questions I fielded:

I worked for a year before taking a break. The job market is still kind of tough. Should I start back at the bottom?

How do I assert myself in a male-dominated environment?

How do I review myself without sounding arrogant?

My company is restructuring. When is the best time to ask for the role I want?

How long should I wait to ask for a promotion?

What is the best way to respond when you’re not given the promotion you’ve asked for?

See full article at Yahoo Finance: Secrets on How To Move Up in Your Career.

 

SixFigureStart in Business Insider – On Thank You Notes and Quitting Your Job

I’m excited to be quoted in two separate pieces in Business Insider, articles by Emmie Martin.

From 6 Tips For Gracefully Quitting Your Job:

Stay positive.

According to Caroline Ceniza-Levine, a career coach with SixFigureStart, resigning in a mean-spirited way is the biggest mistake professionals make. You don’t need to give a reason for leaving, but if you wish to include a bit more context, your formal letter isn’t the place to air your grievances or call out colleagues. While you might be tempted to give your boss the proverbial middle finger — especially if you’re leaving on unfavorable terms — the feeling of satisfaction it gives you will be fleeting (and never worth it).

Not only will acting childish scorn your reputation in the eyes of higher-ups who you might need to later rely on for references, it can burn bridges with coworkers you do intend to keep in touch with. “Even colleagues who don’t have a stake in it are going to see that and think, ‘Wow, that’s really unprofessional, that person is so immature,’” Ceniza-Levine says. 

Don’t get too personal.

There will be people you want to thank, commend, and say goodbye to when you decide to leave. But, Ceniza-Levine suggests you forgo including anything overly personal in your resignation letter. “Instead, send personal thank-yous to individual people,” she says.

Sending individual notes will allow you to personalize each one for the recipient, making them much more meaningful. 

Time it right.

There’s no magic number for how far in advance to announce your departure, but you should aim to give your employer as much time as possible to hire and train a replacement. “Some companies ask for minimum of two weeks, or longer, especially the more senior you are and the bigger projects you’re working on,” Ceniza-Levine says.

However, it’s important to review your company’s policy before resigning, as some offices force you to evacuate immediately. You don’t want to go in thinking you’re giving two weeks notice, only to be told you have 20 minutes.

2. Supplement your interview answers.

Use the thank-you note as an opportunity to expand on points you made during the interview or to add additional information you want the company to know.

But again, remember to keep it concise and job-specific.

“If you feel like you didn’t quite answer a question or couldn’t think of something at the time, you could mention that,” says Caroline Ceniza-Levine, a career coach with SixFigureStart. For example, you could say, “You asked about my experience in the Middle East region, and I forgot to mention that I did this research project on … .”

This is also a great opportunity to send any links to projects, news stories, or websites you may have mentioned during the interview.

Read the full article at Business Insider: How To Write A Thank You Note That Gets You A Job.

 

SixFigureStart in Fast Company: How To Get Promoted Without Working Long Hours

I am excited to be cited in Fast Company on working smarter, not harder, to get your promotion:

Make sure you know how and why people get promoted.

At some organizations, the process is formalized, and at others it’s not, but in any case you can figure out the rules. “Ask your boss up front, or you can ask people who’ve recently been promoted, or ask people in HR what are the factors,” says Caroline Ceniza-Levine, a career coach with Six Figure Start.

If promotions are decided in March, for instance, making a big push in June may not help your cause. If most people who’ve been promoted have published something externally that positions them as thought leaders, you’ll want to get going on that too. You should also make it clear that you want to be considered: “Don’t assume that people know that you want to be promoted,” says Ceniza-Levine. Talk to your boss about what you need to do to be in the running.

Read the full article at Fast Company: How To Get Promoted Without Working Long Hours.

I talk more about promotions on Fox Business Career Accelerator.

I also list 5 Reasons Why You Didn’t Get That Promotion on Purple Clover.

Women and Negotiation – ABC World News Tonight

I made an appearance on ABC World News Tonight for Equal Pay Day:


ABC US News | ABC Business News

Only a few points made it to the segment. What I really wanted to say is that even though, yes, there are challenges to salary negotiation for women, it’s important to remember that for any one woman (and I’m talking to you here!) you only have to worry about your negotiation, not changing the world. There are always things you can do to improve your negotiation skills!

How To Negotiate Severance – Forbes.com

Connie comments on negotiating severance in Susan Adams’ latest piece for Forbes.com: How To Negotiate Severance:

New York career coach Connie Thenasoulis-Cerrachio, who previously worked in human resources for Citigroup C +1.34%, Pfizer PFE +0.07% and Merrill Lynch, says if you’re working on a long-term project or you see a particular need in your department, it’s worth it to offer to complete your assignment and to take on another task. A colleague of hers was about to be let go but wound up filling in for someone more senior who was heading out on maternity leave. He proved himself so valuable that he wound up getting promoted twice.

Read the full article at Forbes.com: How To Negotiate Severance.

5 Career Moves To Make This Year – Fox Business

In my latest appearance on the Fox Business Career Accelerator show, I cover 5 career moves to make this year:


You can see more detail on each of these moves in my blog post on the same topic: Get A Fresh Career Start: 5 Things To Do Differently THIS Year.

Which one are you going to try?

How To Negotiate Salary – Fox Business

I return to Fox Business Career Accelerator to share salary negotiation tips. Remember value over cost. Your compensation is not about cost to the company, but about the value you bring!


Financial Resolutions Should Include Career – SixFigureStart on PBS Nightly Business Report

I’m excited to share career tips on a CNBC segment for the PBS Nightly Business Report. While the segment focuses on financial resolutions, it smartly includes career resolutions, as your ability to earn a salary or launch and grow a business is a major financial asset. This makes updating your skills, maintaining your network and promoting your thought leadership smart financial moves. Jump to minute 23:42 for the start of the segment and 24:45 for the career portion specifically:

Today.com and NBR.com also posted a summary of the segment:

Increase your income and secure your most valuable asset – your career – by making your work indispensable
Your income is likely your greatest financial asset. Like other assets, you want it to appreciate over time. The key to increasing your salary, say career experts, is to make yourself indispensable at work.

“Your company has to need you. Your industry has to need you. Your customers have to need you,” says career expert Caroline Ceniza-Levine, co-founder of Six Figure Start, based in New York. “So you have to be that person where if restructuring happens, if cuts need to be made, if they need to select something for something high profile, they’re going to say ‘We need to have you on that team’.”

Ceniza-Levine suggests taking these steps to help secure your most valuable asset – your career.

  1. Get noticed. Volunteer to lead a project or speak at an event.
  2. Keep your expertise up-to-date. Read industry blogs and trade journals.
  3. Strengthen your network. Meet with a new colleague or reconnect with an old one at least once a month

 

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